Blowjobs: STDs and Oral Sex

The lowdown before you go down

It is a common misconception that oral sex is safe sex. Let’s set the record straight— you CAN get an STD from oral sex. Numerous STDs can be contracted via oral sex by both the giver and receiver, depending on who is the infected partner.

In cases where both parties are simultaneously infected with different STDs, it is possible for each of them to infect the other at the same time. You got it; this means a person can be infected with multiple STDs at the same time.

There are more than 30 types if infections that can be transmitted orally. These most commonly include: herpes, gonorrhea, and syphilis

While these are the most common oral STDs, you should not rule out other infections. Any STD contractible via intercourse is contractible via oral sex. Sound terrifying? Not to worry. Before you go off locking the chains on your chastity belt, read on to find out how all of you downtown lovers, can keep the fellatio alive and infections at bay.

First, the biological basics

STDs are bacteria or viruses that prosper on the type of skin known as the mucous membrane. This type of skin exists on the head of the penis, vaginal walls, vaginal labia, rectum, mouth and throat. All of these areas are prone to infection if they come into contact with an oral or genital STD.

For example, if the giver of oral sex is infected with an oral STD, it is possible that they will transmit their oral STD to the genitals of the receiver. Conversely, if the receiver is infected with a genital STD, it is possible that they will transmit their genital STD to the mouth or throat of the giver.

Furthermore, if both parties have different STDs, it is possible that they both will transmit their STD to the other during this sexual act. Keep in mind that being infected with an STD puts you at a higher risk of catching another STD.

Herpes via oral sex

Herpes, both oral and genital, is the most easily transmitted STD, and therefore very common among the sexually active population. On average, 50 to 80 percent of people carry the oral herpes virus, while one out of every six sexually active adults has genital herpes.

If a person performs oral sex on a person infected with genital herpes, it is possible that they will contract oral herpes. If a person receives oral sex from a person infected with oral herpes, it is possible that they will contract genital herpes. It goes both ways.

Many people who contract herpes do not see or feel any symptoms, while others may experience the following 2–3 weeks after exposure:

Herpes symptoms:

  • Flu–like symptoms with swollen glands on neck (oral) or groin (genital)
  • Itching or burning on mouth or genitals lasting a few days
  • Trouble urinating­– mainly in women with internal vaginal sores
  • Open sores or blisters that are painful, fluid-filled, ooze/puss
    • Oral (HSV–1): blisters around mouth, on lips, gums or tongue
    • Genital (HSV–2)­: sores on or around penis, vagina, or anus

(women can experience sores on the cervix)

  • Crusting of healing sores or blisters

It usually takes about 2–3 weeks after exposure for a physician to accurately test for herpes. If you think you have come into contact with someone infected with herpes, and you are experiencing the above symptoms, make an appointment to see a physician within the proper timeframe.

Chlamydia via oral sex

Although chlamydia is considered one of the less common oral STDs, it can infect the throat in some rare cases. If this transmission does occur, it is most often passed from the male genitals to the back of the partner’s throat. Ejaculation does not have to occur for chlamydia to be transmitted.

Those infected may not have any symptoms of oral chlamydia, while other may experience the following:

Oral Chlamydia symptoms:

  • Sore throat
  • Painful swallowing
  • Cough
  • Fever

Make an appointment with your physician to get an antibiotic prescription if you have performed oral sex on a person infected with chlamydia.

Gonorrhea via oral sex

Gonorrhea has bidirectional transmission capabilities on both the throat and genitals, depending on the point of contact. Although uncommon, gonorrhea can also be found in the front part of the mouth.

Oral gonorrhea often has no symptoms and can be self-healing over time. The 15–20 percent of people who do have symptoms will likely experience the following:

Oral Gonorrhea symptoms

  • Sore throat
  • Painful swallowing
  • Redness in throat
  • White sores that ooze

Gonorrhea of the mouth is difficult to test and treat. If you are experiencing these symptoms after oral sex, contact your physician to be tested within a week of exposure. If you test positive, you can request the antibiotic shot called Ceftriaxone. Otherwise your mucous membrane should tests negative for infection.

Syphilis via oral sex

Syphilis is one of the more severe oral STDs, that if untreated can lead to other bodily complications. Syphilis is primarily spread through direct contact with infected sores. These sores commonly go unnoticed, and as a result the infected person unknowingly passes it on to his or her sex partner. Yes, even through kissing.

Oral Syphilis symptoms

  • Stage–one: (3 weeks after exposure)
    • Small painless sores in or around mouth
  • Stage–two: (6 weeks or more after exposure)
    • White patches on the inside of mouth
    • Swollen lymph glands
    • Fever
    • Weight loss

Syphilis can be diagnosed with a blood test. If recently infected, one dose of penicillin should do the trick. Anyone being treated for syphilis should abstain from any sexual act until completely cleared.

If syphilis is left untreated, it can develop into the tertiary stage where serious problems such as dementia, blindness, heart disease and even death can occur.

HIV via oral sex

Although less risky than anal or vaginal sex, the transmission of HIV is still possible through oral sex. Allowing an HIV–infected person to ejaculate in the mouth is a risky action. The risk is increased if the person giving oral sex has oral sores/blisters, bleeding gums, broken skin, or is currently infected with another STD.

If HIV is contracted orally, it is most commonly transferred from the penis via blowjobs, or from the vagina if a female is menstruating (on her period). Symptoms range from mild to severe.

HIV symptoms (acute phase)

  • Fever or flu–like symptoms
  • Intense fatigue
  • Swollen glands
  • Sore throat
  • Muscle aches
  • Non–itchy rash
  • Night sweats
  • Sores in mouth

Practice safe oral sex

So what have we learned? Curable or not, STDs do not discriminate bodily orifices. A person can contract an STD from giving blowjobs, and a person can contract an STD from receiving blowjobs. Overall, any form of oral sex puts a person at risk of an STD.

Fortunately, getting an STD from oral sex is not inevitable. There are some general rules of thumb that greatly decrease the chances of STD transmission. Other than abstinence, one way to avoid contracting an STD from blowjobs is through condom use. Using a condom can protect both the giver and receiver from getting an STD during oral sex.

It is also a great idea to get routine STD screenings every 3–6 months. If you know that you are going to engage in sexual activity with someone in the future, go get tested together. This way you both know you have a clean bill of health before the act.

Last but not least, long-term monogamous relationships between STD–free partners are a great way to feel safe and secure in every sexual encounter.

 

Fast, Private & Affordable STD Testing


Was this article helpful?